Kepler, Johannes
Old Earth German mathematician (298-339 BT; 1671-1630 AD) who first postulated that the planets revolve around the sun in elliptical orbits, rather than (as had previously been believed) spherical ones.

Old Earth German mathematician who first postulated that the planets revolve
around the sun in elliptical orbits, rather than (as had previously been believed) spherical ones.

Developed Kepler's Three Laws that mathematically describe the elliptical orbits of celestial objects. For several years he worked with Tycho Brahe. He also formulated a hypothesis of planetary spheres in terms of the five platonic solids that, whilst having no factual basis, has had a tremendous aesthetic and philosophical appeal (the culmination being in the construction of Kepleria). Kepler has been described as one of the five greatest pre-singularity scientists. His genome was reconstructed with 81% authenticity during the Interplanetary Era (since fine tuned to 96%) and has been public domain since early First Federation times. There are also several 99.99% grade genomes available, but these are corporate owned and come with annoying disinstallment nano if full payment is not made after a regulation period. A number of these have been hacked and are widely available.

Kepler's First Law of Planetary Motion states that the orbits of the planets are ellipses with the sun at one focus of the ellipse.

Kepler's Second Law of Planetary Motion is equivalent to the conservation of angular momentum. It states that a line from a planet to the sun will sweep out equal areas in equal times. Hence a planet moves more slowly when it is farther from the sun and faster when it is near it.

Kepler's Third Law of Planetary Motion states that T2 is proportional to a3, where T is the orbital period of a planet (its year) and a is the semi-major axis of the ellipse.
 
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Development Notes
Text by M. Alan Kazlev

Initially published on 29 November 2001.