League of Legitimate Businessbeings
League Legitimate Businessbeings
Image from Steve Bowers

Interstellar crime syndicate

Started as a beamed power conglomerate in the Audubon and Terranovan colonies, the League of Legitimate Businessbeings expanded into meteoroid and asteroid control, and provided protection for spacecraft on interplanetary transfer orbits.

Absorbing and developing the memetic complexes associated with successful protection syndicates on several worlds, the League expanded into the Free zones of the NoCoZo after the Linnent worlds affiliated with Merrion in 3900.

Most capos of the League are transapient hyperturing AI of the First Singularity level, although the 'ground troops' are generally drawn from human derived clades.

This paralegal organization is now found in many systems, operates its own security /police force and manages to avoid conflict with local powers by using cost/benefit analysis and carefully applied extortion.

On some worlds the League has worked together with or event replaced local or planetary governments for periods of time. Often the local League cartel members put their past behind them become truly legitimate and independent.

The League generally has a minor or non-existent role to play in the more centralist Sephirotic empires, but it is still quite powerful and important in the NoCoZo, and to a lesser extent in the Orion Federation, STC and Terran Federation.


 
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Development Notes
Text by Steve Bowers

Initially published on 14 September 2002.