Nanomachine

Drextech
Image from Anders Sandberg

Generic term for a microscopic or molecular mechanical (non-biotic) device, for example a hylonanite or nanobot. It is important to note that nanomachines (and indeed nanites in general) do not have to be nanoscale; they may simply be microscale machines that can manipulate nanoscale objects.
 
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Development Notes
Text by M. Alan Kazlev and Pran Mukherjee

Initially published on 09 December 2001.