Gurth Hexanode Repository, The

Gurth Hexanode
Image from Steve Bowers
The Gurth Hexanode Repository is near NGC 6281 on the border between MPA and Negentropy space

The largest virtual complex accessible to modosophonts is generally agreed to be the Gurth Hexanode Repository. Opened in 9723 a.t. after 300 years of construction, the Gurth Hexanodes are the combined work of the Negentropy Alliance, the MPA and the Cyberian Network. The six computronium dyson spheres encircle six stars on the border between the MPA and the Negentropy Alliance, and incorporate 6000 nanogauge wormholes to decrease the communication delay between the different nodes, and different parts of each dyson spheres. Macroscale wormholes connect one node to each of Negentropy Prime, Reylee, Daffy, Majestix, Neovenoa and Alexandria.

Though the repository was built for the Negentropy Alliance for the purpose of information preservation, the Cyberian Network constructed much of the software for the hexanodes, including the transapient search agents. In exchange for their work, the Cyberian Network was allowed temporary use of those parts of the repository which were not yet filled with information. This has resulted in a vast influx of Cyberians, searching out the completely empty and previously unused storage space which the hexanodes provide. The unused parts of the hexanodes are not connected to the nodes' operation system, and thus the newcomers need to start entirely from scratch. A challenge which many of the new arrivals find extremely interesting.

As time has passed, new arrivals have settled down, software standards have been established, and vast virtual polities are arising. Still, some Cyberians feel the need for the challenge of unclaimed computronium, and move further into the empty space, crafting their own virchs with minimal interaction with the outside world. Despite the rate of expansion, it is estimated that 3000 years will pass before Cyberian domains will have to be closed down to make room for Negentropic data.

 
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Development Notes
Text by Thorbjørn Steen

Initially published on 20 April 2007.