Share
Neuro-fractal Patterning

Schpoikes
Image from John B

The science of using fractal patterns to influence the emotional or physical states of intelligent entities. First developed in the late Information and early Unterplanetary ages, the technology truly came into its own when transapient minds began to study and develop it.

Neuro-fractals or fractals as they are more commonly called, use mathematically recursive visual patterns to create psychological and physiological changes in those viewing them. The patterns are often used in place of, or in combination with, graphical displays to indicate a desired course of action across a wide range of languages and toposophic levels.

The Medusa Fractal is a mythical type of neuro-fractal.

Examples of some of the more common fractals are:

Concentration Fractals: Used to promote a state of mental focus and assist in concentrating ones thoughts.

Calm Fractals: Induce a state of calm and reduced emotional stress in those viewing them.

Fractal Feng Shui: Use subtle fractal-based positioning to generate similar effects to Calm fractals.

Meditation Fractals: Used to help promote mental states conducive to meditation. Both Calm and Concentration fractals are types of Meditation fractals.

Disruption Fractals: Induce severe disorientation and nausea in those viewing them. Usually used as a non-lethal form of defensive weapon or during crowd and riot control situations.

Interdiction Fractals: Induce a sense of fear and revulsion in those viewing them. Often used on temporary or low impact barrier systems such as roping off a crime scene or disaster area.

 
Related Articles
  • Bliss Glyph
  • Medusa Fractal
  • Neuronaut - Text by Anders Sandberg in his Transhuman Terminology
    A biont who explores eir own neural functioning and internal mentational processes by various means, including deep introspection and meditation, psychoactive drugs, mind machines, and neuroscientific understanding.
 
Appears in Topics
 
Development Notes
Text by Todd Drashner

Initially published on 28 August 2003.

 
 
>