Vacation Activities
1) Make several to several dozen copies of your mind and send them out on journeys to as many different places/experiences. Later, rejoin and reintegrate them (and their collective experiences) back into your mind.

2) Load a copy of your mind into a non-sophont creature with your higher brain functions partly suppressed. Have the animal released into a preserve area and let it/you live as the animal for a while. After some period of time, have the animal picked up and your mindstate/memories uploaded back into your mind.

3) Meditation in the cloud cities of Cumulus.

4) A cruise (sub or surface) or island hopping vacation on Pacifica.

5) Skiing on the ice moon of a gas giant.

6) Surfing on Midgard at High Tide.

7) A cross-country ski safari on Remagar.

8) A trip (or maybe a tour of duty) on a Deeper Covenant Beamrider.

9) Copy your mind into the cybercore of a probeship to keep its ai company. Some decades or centuries later reintegrate the copy and experience the trip.

10) A photo-safari to Trees or any other Garden World.

11) Hot air ballooning on a small gas giant.

12) Virching into and visiting one of the millions of high-resolution artificial universes within the Cybercosm.

13)Take a sabbatical on a relativistic transport (watch time go by).

14) Visit a world hosting a display of Perfect Art.

 
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Development Notes
Text by Todd Drashner

Initially published on 23 December 2003.