Wallflowers

Genetically modified flowering plants.for architectural display

wallflower
Image from Steve Bowers

The wallflower is a generic label for a group of biotechdecorations. The wallflowers can vary from a single large blossom, to maybe a dozen vines sparsely highlighted by flowers. Wallflowers have a minimalistic tendency, striving for a simple and measured decoration, rather than the luscious explosion of life that is a wallbush. Vertical gardens have long been a popular architectural feature on the outsides of buildings, at first using quite ordinary climbing plants in an artificially maintained substrate.

However unmodified (or badly modified) plants can wither, fail or perhaps worse run riot after a few seasons, high quality wallflowers can produce an impressive show throughout a lifetime, as long as they are properly cared for. Proper care includes keeping them in a proper climate of temperature and air mix, each type of wallflower preferring a different climate. Proper care also includes making sure that they get a proper amount of water and minerals.

Normal wallflowers are usually seated in a wall socket, through which they can draw the proper amount of water and nourishment. However, moisture flowers can simply collect moisture and microscopic carbon and trace mineral particles out of the air, which can be handled through the air mix. Moisture flowers don't require a wall socket, and are thus seen by some as vastly superior to the normal wallflower. Unfortunately moisture flowers tend to be very delicate, and unless the kept under very precise conditions, they tend to wither around the edges.

Wallflowers are popular in the Sophic League, the Communion of Worlds and the Solar Dominion. Though, in some worlds of the Zoeific Biopolity and its sister and daughter polities the wallflower is seen as a sign of bad taste, as it is a purely limited application of biotech, designed for non-biotech dwellings.
 
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Development Notes
Text by Thorbjørn Steen

Initially published on 17 July 2007.