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I've updated the article for Terranova now, assuming that all the planets on the Wikipedia page are existent.
https://orionsarm.com/eg-article/49126e35d4891
I've mostly used John Dollan's images for the inner worlds, where possible.
As suggested in an earlier thread, I've made Terranova resonant with 82 G Eridani f.
Rather than leave the planets unnamed, I've named them all after famous ships from the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration (I suppose I should edit Terranova's name to Terra Nova, now).
(11-27-2019, 12:47 AM)stevebowers Wrote: [ -> ]I've updated the article for Terranova now, assuming that all the planets on the Wikipedia page are existent.
https://orionsarm.com/eg-article/49126e35d4891
I've mostly used John Dollan's images for the inner worlds, where possible.
As suggested in an earlier thread, I've made Terranova resonant with 82 G Eridani f.
Rather than leave the planets unnamed, I've named them all after famous ships from the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration (I suppose I should edit Terranova's name to Terra Nova, now).

Looks good. I wonder why the Terranova Foundation + the Grue Brothers named the planets after famous ships to Antarctica... Wait, maybe they're the survivors of the Antarcticans?
Also, a Ferrinian? That implies some really unusual formation in order to get really iron-rich big planet.

By the way, the name 'Terranova' seems good to me.
I'm assuming that this planet is denser than Earth, and has lost some of its crustal mass in an earlier collision (or several).
Yes, the Grue Brothers could have been Antarctican before the Great Expulsion.
(11-27-2019, 01:06 AM)stevebowers Wrote: [ -> ]I'm assuming that this planet is denser than Earth, and has lost some of its crustal mass in an earlier collision (or several).

Hmm, yeah, Hermeans and Ferrinians need to either be merged or separated distinctly. I say Ferrinians are those so-called 'cannonballs' with a ridiculous iron fraction of like over 80% mass or so, as described. It seems very difficult to form one.

(11-27-2019, 01:09 AM)stevebowers Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, the Grue Brothers could have been Antarctican before the Great Expulsion.

This is a great idea. Although Antarctican cultures have mostly vanished due to the Technocalypse, remnants of it could be present in the form of diasporas or revivalists, although weathering the Sundering I think some information they have about the pioneers of what would become their land might've been wrong. A few mistakes in the form of missing names, fictional names, and altered names should make for a nice touch, in my opinion.
btw I think an article update report would better fit this thread, but well it's mentioned in the first post, can't be helped Tongue
(11-27-2019, 01:11 AM)The Astronomer Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-27-2019, 01:06 AM)stevebowers Wrote: [ -> ]I'm assuming that this planet is denser than Earth, and has lost some of its crustal mass in an earlier collision (or several).

Hmm, yeah, Hermeans and Ferrinians need to either be merged or separated distinctly. I say Ferrinians are those so-called 'cannonballs' with a ridiculous iron fraction of like over 80% mass or so, as described. It seems very difficult to form one.

(11-27-2019, 01:09 AM)stevebowers Wrote: [ -> ]Yes, the Grue Brothers could have been Antarctican before the Great Expulsion.

This is a great idea. Although Antarctican cultures have mostly vanished due to the Technocalypse, remnants of it could be present in the form of diasporas or revivalists, although weathering the Sundering I think some information they have about the pioneers of what would become their land might've been wrong. A few mistakes in the form of missing names, fictional names, and altered names should make for a nice touch, in my opinion.

I think that "cannonball" planets are possible to form in at least one way, which I saw in a really old Poul Anderson story. "Mirkheim", I think. Very simply, a perfectly normal planet subjected to a nearby supernova and all but an iron core is boiled off. In that story, it was worth exploiting as a source of superheavy elements.

Another way for something like this to happen is a fairly normal Jovian which is perturbed out of its normal orbit into a star-grazing one and most of its mass similarly boiled off.
(11-28-2019, 08:14 AM)iancampbell Wrote: [ -> ]
(11-27-2019, 01:11 AM)The Astronomer Wrote: [ -> ]Hmm, yeah, Hermeans and Ferrinians need to either be merged or separated distinctly. I say Ferrinians are those so-called 'cannonballs' with a ridiculous iron fraction of like over 80% mass or so, as described. It seems very difficult to form one.
I think that "cannonball" planets are possible to form in at least one way, which I saw in a really old Poul Anderson story. "Mirkheim", I think. Very simply, a perfectly normal planet subjected to a nearby supernova and all but an iron core is boiled off. In that story, it was worth exploiting as a source of superheavy elements.

Another way for something like this to happen is a fairly normal Jovian which is perturbed out of its normal orbit into a star-grazing one and most of its mass similarly boiled off.

Still, without either scenario being plausible in this system (the second would probably result in a silicate core anyways), it's kind of hard to imagine something happening that would result in an Earth-massed cannonball, especially in a tightly-packed system like this one...
The multiple impact model probably works best. If we assume that the planet forms near the star, with an ambient temperature that boils away silicon but not metal, this would create a hot iron planet. The challenge then is how to get the planet to its current orbit.
(11-28-2019, 08:16 PM)stevebowers Wrote: [ -> ]The multiple impact model probably works best. If we assume that the planet forms near the star, with an ambient temperature that boils away silicon but not metal, this would create a hot iron planet. The challenge then is how to get the planet to its current orbit.

Yeah, now that I've thought about it, getting it into the current orbit is probably as big, or bigger of a problem than how to create it in the first place. Very dense big terrestrial planets are not unheard of, but I assume they require some space.
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