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Full Version: Magnetic fields in tidally locked planets
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I read that planets like this probably don't have magnetic fields because of the lack of convection in the core of the planet, however, and if the planet rotates with the rotation axis always pointing towards the star, that way the attraction of the star would be equally distributed and would not slow down the rotation of the planet. Taking all this into account, would it be possible for a planet that is gravitationally locked to maintain the processes at its core that allow a strong magnetic field?
Planets that are tidally-locked but which are candidates for terraformation can, in the OA scenario, be protected by an artificial magnetosphere. This can take the form of a Lagrange Magshield, which can be combined with a Sunshaper if the solar flux is too high or too low at the planet's surface.

Another, slightly smaller scale, proposal for an artificial planetary magnetosphere I've read about uses a series of superconducting loops at or near the planetary surface. This would require somewhat less power for the same amount of protection, but the magnetic fields in close proximity to the loops might cause some undesirable effects. Nevertheless I think I'll mention this method on the magshield page.
(06-03-2020, 07:33 AM)Baleia espacial Wrote: [ -> ]... if the planet rotates with the rotation axis always pointing towards the star, that way the attraction of the star would be equally distributed and would not slow down the rotation of the planet.
A planet with the rotation axis pointing directly at the star is very unlikely, because it would require the planet to precess once a year- this would effectively mean the planet had two different axes of rotation, and this would quite quickly evolve into random tumbling. A planet or moon that is tidally locked and stable has its rotation axis at right angles to its orbital plane, give or take a few degrees.

Quote: Taking all this into account, would it be possible for a planet that is gravitationally locked to maintain the processes at its core that allow a strong magnetic field?
On the other hand this may be possible. Many planets in close orbits around small stars have rotational periods a few days long, or even as short as a single Earth Day (or less). Such planets could easily retain a magnetic field (depending on the planet's internal composition, of course).