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Icy 'Super-Earth' Exoplanet Spotted Around Nearby Barnard's Star
#1
This may have already been brought up here, but I don't remember seeing it.

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#2
A change to the Barnard's Star article is in order, it seems.
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#3
(11-24-2018, 03:14 PM)stevebowers Wrote: A change to the Barnard's Star article is in order, it seems.

It's cold, but is it actually icy? OA's Barnard's Star is noted for its lack of volatiles. A volatile-rich terrestrial planet throws a couple of articles off-kilter. 

It's pretty easy to deprive terrestrial planets of volatiles with planet-scale impacts, though.
Mike Miller, Materials Engineer
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"Everbody's always in favor of saving Hitler's brain, but when you put it in the body of a great white shark, oh, suddenly you've gone too far." -- Professor Farnsworth, Futurama
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#4
This object might only have a thinnish layer of water ice - making it technically a superarean world.
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#5
(11-28-2018, 02:34 AM)stevebowers Wrote: This object might only have a thinnish layer of water ice - making it technically a superarean world.

Hmm. Now I'm starting to see a world that plugs into Barnard's Star, Barnard Belt, and the volatile shortages.

A beefy super-terrestrial planet with limited permafrost reserves would be hard to access during the First Federation, so the system description of being volatile-poor doesn't need to change. By the time it's easier to regularly access super-terrestrials, a clade of high-G tweaks might've monopolized the world and its resources.

And the planet would make a good shepherd for the system's asteroid belt.

I'll finish up Gearhead...soon...and get to work on something for Barnard's World.

No, "van de Kamp's World"! That's gotta be the name.
Mike Miller, Materials Engineer
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"Everbody's always in favor of saving Hitler's brain, but when you put it in the body of a great white shark, oh, suddenly you've gone too far." -- Professor Farnsworth, Futurama
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#6
I've updated the Barnard's Star article with this data. When I made an image of this planet for the article, I discovered that the Sun (as seen from Barnard's Star) appears to be embedded in Barnard's loop as part of the constellation Orion. This is one of those weird coincidences that happens so frequently in astronomy.

https://orionsarm.com/eg-article/4609c8d6cadb4


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#7
Sweet. I'll jump on van de Kamp and Barnard's rewrite soon.
Mike Miller, Materials Engineer
----------------------

"Everbody's always in favor of saving Hitler's brain, but when you put it in the body of a great white shark, oh, suddenly you've gone too far." -- Professor Farnsworth, Futurama
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