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Circumstellar Disk Imaged
#1
Hubble spots Jotunns (or some other space blob) in stellar disc:
https://spacetelescope.org/images/opo190...R4irEtYQWA
Mike Miller, Materials Engineer
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"Everbody's always in favor of saving Hitler's brain, but when you put it in the body of a great white shark, oh, suddenly you've gone too far." -- Professor Farnsworth, Futurama
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#2
Neat! I wonder what a Terragens colony might do with such a star system, particularly the blobs and the disk.

Thoughts?

Todd
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#3
They'd discover ancient, non-sentient bots constructing pointless megastructures out of the dust, awaiting the time when their long-dead creators finally arrive on the scene to tell them that the job is done. Vast, worm-like machines composed of interlinked ring-shaped bots, composed of exotic ices, consuming dust and excreting bubble-shaped habitats and vehicles that eventually fall to pieces over the millennia.
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#4
AU Microscopii is only 32 light years away; this system would be a prime target for factions looking for non-planetary resources.

A probe ship arriving from Sol might see a view something like this.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
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#5
Here's a nice animation of the lumpy structures as they move through the disk.

[Image: GrimGlitteringAuklet-small.gif]
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#6
(01-09-2019, 11:58 PM)Drashner1 Wrote: Neat! I wonder what a Terragens colony might do with such a star system, particularly the blobs and the disk.

Thoughts?

Something like Gearhead or the Bernard Belt - a space based industrial system. I have a planned write-up for Beta Pictoris and an idea for J1407, so I'd be getting a bit repetitive if I tried it.

Though, given the proximity to Sol and that this is a red dwarf (right?), it might be a target for one of the AI's that fled Sol prior to the Technocalypse.
Mike Miller, Materials Engineer
----------------------

"Everbody's always in favor of saving Hitler's brain, but when you put it in the body of a great white shark, oh, suddenly you've gone too far." -- Professor Farnsworth, Futurama
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#7
(01-10-2019, 09:02 AM)Cray Wrote:
(01-09-2019, 11:58 PM)Drashner1 Wrote: Neat! I wonder what a Terragens colony might do with such a star system, particularly the blobs and the disk.

Thoughts?

Something like Gearhead or the Bernard Belt - a space based industrial system. I have a planned write-up for Beta Pictoris and an idea for J1407, so I'd be getting a bit repetitive if I tried it.

Though, given the proximity to Sol and that this is a red dwarf (right?), it might be a target for one of the AI's that fled Sol prior to the Technocalypse.

Hm. Quite possibly. Maybe the original AI came and went and left behind a free space mechosystem. What's the correct term for a botworld, but in space? Botsystem?

Todd
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#8
Yes, it is a red dwarf. It is in Celestia as HIP 102409.

This star is only 26 million years old - part of the Beta Pictoris moving group, a dispersed former star cluster that has split apart relatively recently. Beta Pictoris, AT Microscopii and a number of other stars in this group all have similar disks, where planet formation continues.
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#9
(01-10-2019, 07:31 PM)stevebowers Wrote: This star is only 26 million years old - part of the Beta Pictoris moving group, a dispersed former star cluster that has split apart relatively recently. Beta Pictoris, AT Microscopii and a number of other stars in this group all have similar disks, where planet formation continues.


AT Microscopii is some tens of light-years from Beta Pictoris, isn't it?
Mike Miller, Materials Engineer
----------------------

"Everbody's always in favor of saving Hitler's brain, but when you put it in the body of a great white shark, oh, suddenly you've gone too far." -- Professor Farnsworth, Futurama
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#10
Yes. The open cluster that they were both formed in has spread out already, in the last 26 million years.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta_Picto...ving_group
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