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Exoplanet Discoveries and Updates
#81
Same thing as above for Barnard's Star b, turning out to be an alias of the star's 145 day rotation period.
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#82
Today a rather big paper dropped. The paper lists a number of planets, as well as making its own discoveries and determining false positives.

Most notable of them are a new, potentially Neptune or Saturn-like planet at Lalande 21185, and the confirmation of one planet around Lambda Serpentis and 14 Herculis each.

Lalande 21185 c
Semi-major axis: 3.1 AU
Orbital period: 8.73 years
Eccentricity: 0.14
Minimum mass: 18.0 Earth masses

Lambda Serpentis b
Semi-major axis: 0.1238 AU
Orbital period: 15.5083 days
Eccentricity: 0.16
Minimum mass: 13.6 Earth masses

Several planets have been determined as false positives, including 61 Virginis d, known in Orion's Arm as Iolus. That planet was kind of in the way of Eostremonath, so this might be a good news if it means we can replace it with a smaller planet with more circular orbit.
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#83
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/tiny...-iron-star
A newly discovered exoplanet is really making astronomers prove their mettle.

GJ 367 is a red dwarf 31 light years away in Vela.

The exoplanet was first spotted in data from NASA’s TESS telescope in 2019.

Period 7.7 hours


Diameter .72 Earth, 9184 kms., 5707 miles.

Mass .55 Earth    3.2841e24 kg.

Irradiation 500 times Earth

Temperature 1,500 Celsius, 2,732 Fahrenheit

Density 8.1 g/cc
86 percent of it could comprise an iron core, with only a sliver of rock left on top.

Is there enough information here to include it in the EG?
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#84
Sure, there should be. I doubt that a planet this small could retain much of an atmosphere, unless it were silicate or metal vapour of some sort. A tricky place for colonisation, although a tidally-locked world would be somewhat cooler on the dark side. Perhaps it would be better disassembled to create megastructures at a cooler distance.
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#85
(12-04-2021, 10:45 PM)stevebowers Wrote: Sure, there should be. I doubt that a planet this small could retain much of an atmosphere, unless it were silicate or metal vapour of some sort. A tricky place for colonisation, although a tidally-locked world would be somewhat cooler on the dark side. Perhaps it would be better disassembled to create megastructures at a cooler distance.

As an intermediate step, it might be doable to set up automated resource extraction systems (possibly just on the dark side depending on how intense local conditions are) that launch payloads out to a habitat(s) orbiting at some more comfortable distance.

This is basically planetary disassembly, just slower. Smile

Todd
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