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Proof-reading EG
If Unruh radiation is visible to observers not in the frame of the spacecraft, that suggests that it is generated by the movement of the spacecraft, like the heat of friction. So Unruh radiation should somehow extract energy from the speed of the craft, and slow it down slightly. That is, if it exists at all.
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Unruh radiation only appears when your ship is accelerating, and even then you'd have to have insane accelerations to even make it visible or heat your spaceship up.
1.235e+23 m/s-2 acceleration will raise the temperature by 500 K. Its certainly not going to slow down your spaceship, only by an infinitesimally small amount.
"Scientia Est Potientia."
       Knowledge is power.
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Remember that the void pockets would be generating the radiation, not the ships they”re pulling. The pockets propelling a Halo Ship are constantly accelerating. Motion in a circle is caused by acceleration, just not in a straight line. I dunno if the amount of acceleration has been explicitly calculated, but I think they are supposed to be traveling near c, so the relatively small circles (about 10 km across?) they have to go in to stay near a ship must be the result of extremely high acceleration.
Selden
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I'll remove the reference to Cherenkov radiation- that certainly seems to be an error.
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Are backups of stories available?

Chapter 2 of bAdmod https://orionsarm.com/xcms.php?r=oa-page&page_id=261
ends in the middle of a sentence, and Chapter 3 seems to reference events which might have taken place after that point.

Chapter 3 ends in the middle of a sentence, too.
Selden
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Fixed, thanks! I went to the Wayback Machine to get the oldest version.

I think I'll add links between these pages, to facilitate flipping between them.
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Thanks! Having to go back and to try to remember which part I’d just read was a bit annoying.
Selden
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Done.
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On the black hole page the link to the Hawking radiation calculator is down and has been for a while. The closest equivalent I could find is this calculator which seems to be an exact clone of Xaonon's version with the exception of a different initial default mass and the addition of a peak photon wavelength function.
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On the Argus Array page the figure given for the light gathering capability of the Argus Array, just over 10^27 m^2, is inconsistent with the description of the array as 8000 20 AU diameter spheres. Assuming the array is composed of 8000 20 AU wide bubbles its cross section would be pi*(10 AU)^2*8000 or 5.625*10^28 m^2. This discrepancy seems to be caused by two factors. First what seems to be the original source for the 10^27 figure uses a factor of 2pi for the cross-sectional area calculation instead of just pi, while the surface area that could view an arbitrary portion of the sky would be 2pi*r^2 (as the surface area of one hemisphere would be half of the sphere's total surface area of 4pi*r^2) much of this surface is at an angle and the total cross section and thus effective light gathering area would be still pi*r^2. The other cause seems to be an order of magnitude error. While 2pi*(10 AU)^2*8000 is still not consistent with 10^27 m^2 if 10 AU is substituted with 1 AU then the resulting figure is 1.125*10^27 m^2 or just over 10^27 m^2 which matches what currently appears in the article.

In order for the Argus Array page to be self-consistent either the light gathering area must be increased to 5.625*10^28 m^2 (and the necessary photon collection times be recalculated), the number of sensor elements be reduced 160 20 AU telescopes, the number of elements be kept the same but the diameter of each telescope be reduced from 20 AU to 2√2 AU, or some combination of the previous.
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