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Proof-reading EG
(03-22-2017, 07:10 AM)Rynn Wrote: What are the spikes supposed to be? The god star article is old and could do with an update. I interpret one as being a star with a truly massive quantity of magmatter infrastructure to the point that a significant fraction of it operates as a plasma processor. Thus the star who led be intensely active, pumping out vastly more energy than a normal star and probably constantly balanced on the point where anymore energy would cause it to come apart.

Thus a god star would be bright, hot, large and relatively short lived.

Don't forget that a godstar would be using conversion rather than fusion and could import additional matter (in stellar mass quantities via grazers if so desired) if the archailect mind wished to do so. So a godstar might actually be much much longer lived than a natural star.

I also don't really see a godstar as being mostly magmatter or the like - it's made of plasma processors after all - from the surface all the way to the core, quite possibly. It might run hotter than a natural star, but it also need not radiate vastly more to support a hugely powerful mind.

Todd
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The description of plasma processors in the article at http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/506308cd7f8c1 says that magmatter is used to support plasma processing, both to constrain the plasma and to provide data storage. The ratio of magmatter to plasma isn't mentioned, either in terms of its volume or its mass, but I get the impression that it's a substantial fraction in either case. Of course, to the extent that such articles are trying to describe high-transapient technologies in terms that a modosophont can understand, they can't help but be misleading.
Selden
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(03-22-2017, 01:17 PM)selden Wrote: The description of plasma processors in the article at http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/506308cd7f8c1 says that magmatter is used to support plasma processing, both to constrain the plasma and to provide data storage. The ratio of magmatter to plasma isn't mentioned, either in terms of its volume or its mass, but I get the impression that it's a substantial fraction in either case. Of course, to the extent that such articles are trying to describe high-transapient technologies in terms that a modosophont can understand, they can't help but be misleading.

The thing to keep in mind is that magmatter can generate enormously powerful magnetic fields. So a plasma processor consists of a 3 dimensional magmatter mesh (that might look something like a brain or one of those maps/diagrams of a nervous system - but denser and more complex) surrounded by high energy plasma that is configured to act as a computing medium. Because magmatter is so much stronger than conventional matter it can operate at energies that would be greater than the strength of chemical bonds and so would tear any form of conventional matter apart - so it can process data (flip bits) at speeds beyond anything physically possible for regular matter.

The mesh configures itself (both within the individual strands making it up and it's macro-structure) to shape the plasma into computing elements. Data is stored in the structure of the mesh in the form of either magnetic storage (think an old style magnetic floppy disk, but with energy and material densities vastly greater) or 'mag-molecular storage' - storing bits in a manner analogous to how nanotech based molecular storage stores data - via DNA like structures or in mag-atoms and mag-electrons (RL experimental tech can store data in DNA, in other molecular structures and even in single electrons). Due to their much smaller size, and the much higher energies they can withstand, magmatter molecular and electronic data storage can fit much more data into a given volume than conventional matter devices.

Magmatter can also support production of gamma ray lasers for data transmission and maybe even 'gamma ray fiber optics' - if transparent (to gamma rays) versions can be made)

So basically, the magmatter itself might take up a fairly small percentage of a given PP, but the magnetic fields it produces could make up a much larger volume.

Todd
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Disarchy, Nuisance, & Great Ecologist articles fixed.

Thanks!
Stephen
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http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/464e942db2789
Ginnungagap Theory, The

it seems unlike the dwellers would be able
should be
it seems unlikely the dwellers would be able
Selden
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http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/4648f934c38f8
Cygnus Loop

English usage:

The supernova exploded about 15,000 b.c.e. years ago
should be either
The supernova exploded at about 15,000 b.c.e.
or
The supernova exploded about 15,000 years ago

Data:

Relatively recent studies have revised the position of the SNR to be closer (1470 ly), its size to be smaller (down from 150 ly to 90 ly) and the date of the explosion to be more recent: between 5,000 and 8,000 years ago.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygnus_Loop#Distance

See also
https://archive.stsci.edu/fuse/scisumm/s...pstar.html
http://pages.jh.edu/~news_info/news/home...gloop.html
http://blair.pha.jhu.edu/cyglpstar.html


I don't think these changes would affect anything else in OA.
Selden
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Celsius should be added.

Even with meteorological tweaking and greenhouse engineering the climate remains colder than on Earth, just 17 degrees on average. At the same time the weather is more variable than on Earth, due to both stronger temperature differences in the interior between summer and winter (causing major storms), the short day and the irregular volcanic eruptions. The maintaining of a greenhouse effect is important on Nova Terra, since without it the planet would enter a permanent glaciation.

http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/48e2e21ee6d7f
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Does the bold mean below the planet crust? 

Even with meteorological tweaking and greenhouse engineering the climate remains colder than on Earth, just 17 degrees on average. At the same time the weather is more variable than on Earth, due to both stronger temperature differences in the interior between summer and winter (causing major storms), the short day and the irregular volcanic eruptions. The maintaining of a greenhouse effect is important on Nova Terra, since without it the planet would enter a permanent glaciation.

http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/48e2e21ee6d7f
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I'm pretty sure it means in the interior of landmasses, i.e. away from the coasts.

Radtech497
"I'd much rather see you on my side, than scattered into... atoms." Ming the Merciless, Ruler of the Universe
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That's right. A world with a single continent. like Nova Terra or Earth during the Pangaea area, would display great temperature differences in the cantre of the land-mass. Even on Earth today the centres of continents show a greater range, cold in the winter and hot in the summer. The centre of Pangaea was probably an inhospitable desert unlike anything we have today although there could have been megamonsoons at various latitudes as well.
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