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Proof-reading EG
(07-24-2016, 11:36 PM)selden Wrote: Some more incorrect star designations:

Alpha Areitis -> Alpha Arietis in http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/49fc193234b06

Eta Sagittarius -> Eta Sagittarii in http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/464ceaad61e78
and many more Sad

Alpha Aquarius -> Alpha Aquarii in
http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/4911ce8f43ea3
http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45cd3240ea58a
http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45bcbeb588b26
All fixed.
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(07-25-2016, 06:30 AM)stevebowers Wrote: There are around a billion stars in the Terragen Sphere, including red dwarfs and so on; there must be at least a million wormholes, probably many times that. We'll never be able to make a map of the Nexus by hand. Maybe some clever soul could make a program up to generate a wormhole map from certain predetermined parameters; but this might be best left until the Gaia information is available.

The gazetteer lists only 94 of them, though. A visual display showing the major interconnections and those which are used in stories written about OA probably would be sufficient. At least for now.
Selden
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If we show a representative fraction of the major long distance Wormhole routes that could be useful. This would probably take the form of a ring of radiating lines each around a thousand light years long, leading from major relay systems about 100 ly from Sol and connected to the Inner Sphere nexus. Each end of these long distance 'holes would have a fuzzy cloud of shorter distance 'holes, and perhaps two or three long distance holes connecting to the outermost end.

Probably easiest to make a model (note- these do not represent actual locations- just a representation of the pattern probably formed by such a network)


Attached Files Image(s)
   
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Yeah the inner sphere is a lot messier than the vast majority of the Nexus. Good image.
OA Wish list:
  1. DNI
  2. Internal medical system
  3. A dormbot, because domestic chores suck!
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A nice image, but I would advise against providing any specific distance for how far any particular wormhole link extends.

While there is very probably some optimum distance for spacing out Relay systems for maximum coverage or most efficient transit or whatever, we've not really worked that out yet, and I'm not sure we could do so without significant thought and discussion. The ability of wormholes to bridge any distance with the same travel time tends to lead to counterintuitive results that may be quite different from how SF normally depicts travel with its tendency to treat it as sea or air travel (but in space).

Using the graphic to represent the structure of the Nexus, while not mentioning distances, gets the main point across and avoids potentially having to do retconning later.

In addition (or alternatively perhaps) we could give some thought and discussion to the role that distance might play in the structure and operation of the Nexus.

Todd
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Wormhole Gazetteer

The content of the two tables, the first listing individual wormholes and the second listing wormholes by system, differ from one another.

For example, Chi Draconis and Silence are listed only in the second table.

It'd be really nice if they could be made to agree. Hopefully the first list can be updated algorithmically from the second instead of having to do it all manually.

A content suggestion, which probably should be elsewhere: It'd be really nice if the first table included the wormhole creation date. This is an example where having all the entries be links would make it a *lot* easier to track down that information.
Selden
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(08-01-2016, 12:06 AM)selden Wrote: Wormhole Gazetteer

The content of the two tables, the first listing individual wormholes and the second listing wormholes by system, differ from one another.

For example, Chi Draconis and Silence are listed only in the second table.

It'd be really nice if they could be made to agree. Hopefully the first list can be updated algorithmically from the second instead of having to do it all manually.

A content suggestion, which probably should be elsewhere: It'd be really nice if the first table included the wormhole creation date. This is an example where having all the entries be links would make it a *lot* easier to track down that information.

It's unfortunate that the two tables don't agree. Unfortunately, they are just static tables generated manually via our content management system and any sort of update/correction will also need to be done manually.

Regarding your content suggestion - Before we start thinking about going down this road, I would strongly urge caution. In all likelihood a fair number of the wormholes listed have no creation date in their EG article since that is not something we've every seen as generally significant. Any such listings in an EG would be just because an individual author felt like including that information. The focus of OA is Y11k after all, and from that period in OA history, most wormholes have been in place for thousands of years.

Beyond this, and looking at the issue from an editorial perspective, I would again strongly advise that we be cautious here and have a good think about if this is something we want to do. We are already in a situation where some members (myself included) think we spend too much time focused on the early timeline, and get into more detail then is probably good for us. Adding yet another mass of dates to that seems likely to only exacerbate this problem.

Beyond that, given the often fluctuating nature of the project, and the limitations of our current structure and content management tools, every time we want to make any kind of significant adjustment to the dates in the timeline, it means we have to make a bunch of manual changes, sometimes on multiple pages (which we don't have a record of and may not remember all of at the time). Adding yet more dates to manage as part of any changes, seems like it's just asking for more headaches.

If we are to consider adding yet more dates to the project, I would suggest that we should take a large step back and reconsider the entire mechanism by which we generate and manage the OA timeline. Because the purely manual process we have now is already unwieldy and seems likely to become more so, the more content we add to it.

Todd
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http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45bcc0ea9004c

The first paragraph of the Outer Volumes article seems to be missing some text and part of a paragraph break seems to be missing at its end. Currently it ends with
"It is poorly (and often not at all) served by stargates, and for the most part the great powers only local jurisdictions or spheres of influence within its vastness."

After rereading it several times, I finally came to the conclusion that there's at least a "have" missing. It might have been intended to say something like

"It is poorly (and often not at all) served by stargates, and for the most part the great powers [have] only [relatively small] local jurisdictions or spheres of influence within its vastness."

(without the [ ] brackets, which I inserted only to emphasize my suggestions.)

Also, there's no blank line between the end of that first paragraph and the start of the second, as there is between all of the other paragraphs.
Selden
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(08-06-2016, 07:59 AM)selden Wrote: http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-topic/45bcc0ea9004c

The first paragraph of the Outer Volumes article seems to be missing some text and part of a paragraph break seems to be missing at its end. Currently it ends with
"It is poorly (and often not at all) served by stargates, and for the most part the great powers only local jurisdictions or spheres of influence within its vastness."

After rereading it several times, I finally came to the conclusion that there's at least a "have" missing. It might have been intended to say something like

"It is poorly (and often not at all) served by stargates, and for the most part the great powers [have] only [relatively small] local jurisdictions or spheres of influence within its vastness."

(without the [ ] brackets, which I inserted only to emphasize my suggestions.)

Also, there's no blank line between the end of that first paragraph and the start of the second, as there is between all of the other paragraphs.

Thanks! I notice our older version of the EG is no longer available for common reference, so I can't provide a link to it any more. However I have a copy. Several years ago, the full text for that article read:

Variously known as the the Outer Volume(s), the Outer Sphere, the Hinterworlds, the Edge, and the Rim (the latter term being misleading and is more technically applied to the galactic rim, rather than the rim of terragen colonisation), the Outer Volumes comprise that vast and ever changing, every expanding volume of colonised, inhabitated and penetrated space beyond the stable regions and ancient empires of the Inner Sphere; beyond even the partially consolidated expanses of the hinteregions. It is poorly (and often not at all) served by stargates, and the great powers have for the most part only local jurisdiction of spheres of influence within its vastness

Because it remains largely an unknown quantity, the Outer Volume has served as a rich source of dramatic fiction and urban folklore ever since the late Federation period and the Age of Expansion (the outward rushing crest that expansion being of course the original Outer Volumes and periphery). Because it has been virtually ignored by the leaders of the old Inner Sphere empires since the time of the Commonwealth of Empires, the average person's sum total knowledge of the Outer Volumes consists of trickle of information, and a vast ocean of rumour, disinformation and infotainment, brought to the Provinces and the Inner Sphere by researchers, traders, venture capitalists, missionaries, and adventurers.

The prejudice directed at the bionts, vecs, and AIs of the Outer Volumes has been a major source of tension between the inhabitants of those regions and polities and the Inner Sphere empires for millennia. The most widely accepted view of the Outer Volumes characterizes the inhabitants as a collection of pirates, bandits, religious extremists, and rogue empires. Though the Outer Volumes certainly harbors many such as that, the population of that area is much more diverse. To take such a narrow view does a disservice to the majority of hard-working, decent sentients who went to the Outer Volumes simply for the opportunities it offered for adventure, exploration, and the chance to start a new life.

Isolated by vast distances and limited resources from the industrial and knowledge base of the Core, and backward in time even due to the relativistic effects of empire time, the Outer Volumes biospheres and states have always fought an uphill battle to gain economic stability and establish a technological level capable of competing with the Inner Sphere - and defending against incursions both by Core empires and by other Peripheral realms. Empires such as the powerful Laughter Hegemony and the Puppis Democracy currently seem very close to reaching technological parity with the very best of the Inner Sphere, while the Emple-Dokcetics have become a major power and actually have technological superiority in areas such as picotechnology over the inner sphere empires. Other Outer Volume states also appear to be taking firmer steps toward finding permanent solutions to their economic and military problems.

Meanwhile, the true Outer Volumes and Periphery of penetrated and colonised space continues to expand outwards at relativistic speed; an advanced guard of high transapients from many different factions is moving faster than the main exploration wave front. This advanced expansion wave is often known as the Light Speed Frontier, although it in facts moves only a few percent of the speed of light faster than the main wave front.


I'll fix up the bit you mentioned, of course, but it also appears we've some other material from the old version that was deleted in an earlier edit. Obviously it needs a bit of updating (no picotech now), but I suggest we reintroduce it in modified form.
Stephen
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http://www.orionsarm.com/eg-article/4a1658c2ba874

The Outer Sphere article states
"the Mobile Frontier, an ever expanding zone nearly fourteen thousand light years across at its greatest extent."

I'm probably overlooking something, but my understanding is that OA's "current date" is Y11K with an offset from our current dating system. As a result, I think that the above statement might be better as "the Mobile Frontier, an ever expanding zone which is currently somewhat less than twenty thousand light years across at its greatest extent."

Otherwise, something like 5 to 8 thousand years have disappeared somewhere Smile
Selden
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